Medicine Wheel Ceremony Tour Sedona Arizona

Medicine Wheel CeremonyA Medicine Wheel is a ceremonial tool used by many spiritual people all over the world to perform rituals that honor the four directions, the sacred hoop of life, the animals, the sun and moon, Mother Earth and Father Sky, and many more aspects of the natural world.

Some Native Americans believe that “Medicine” is anything that deepens your relationship with the Creator and the Great Spirit.

The wheel is a circle divided into four directions, the east, south, west and north. Also a symbol of astrology, each person is represented somewhere within that circle depending upon their birth moth and day. That placement is associated with a special moon, power animal, totem clan, healing plant, color and mineral.

At the wheel, we say a prayer for releasing, forgiveness, gratitude and abundance. When we speak out loud to the universe we are stating our intentions and this is very powerful. I’ve seen miraculous things happen, some of which most people won’t believe or even understand.

Before entering the wheel in the East we will offer some kind of herb or prayer. This is an offering to let the spirits know the we enter with pure hearts and leave any ego or negativity outside of the sacred wheel. Cornmeal, tobacco, sage, cedar, roses and many other natural gifts are offered before going into the wheel. I’ve also seen gold glitter. Offering something before we enter the wheel is a good practice. It is said that before we enter any sacred space or even just going out into nature for a vision quest, it is good practice to offer something at the “door.” Just as some tradition will do, going to see someone at their house, they will offer a gift. It’s also common practice to smudge yourself before going into ceremony.

We’ve worked with children from the age of three and the grandmothers and grandfathers, all seem to have something to pray about.

The prayer we hold is not tied to any religion, it includes all living things such as the Creator, the Great Spirit, the animals, the four directions of the universe, our ancestors, and other things that bring us closer to nature. It’s also like stating your intentions.

The sound of the drum and rattle is healing and have been used for thousands of years. Some receive healing from the sound and some receive a vision.

medicine wheel sedona sunset tourThe medicine wheel dates back thousands of years originating from the Lakota Sioux. Today, Medicine Wheel ceremonies are becoming more popular and can be found all over the world. As the teachings spread to different cultures, it is a bit modified, therefore not every ceremony will be alike. Each will be a bit different and that’s okay.

In the Medicine Wheel we drum and sing songs for forgiveness and gratitude. We offer our blessings and prayers to Mother Earth and Father Sky, to Grandfather Sun and Grandmother Moon, to the four directions and the animals that represent them.

Most people experience a lightness and tingling sensation. Some don’t want to leave the wheel because they feel so connected a sense of true security that they are afraid to leave the wheel and loose it. This is a feeling and an experience that can be done at any time and in any place.

The medicine wheel is a symbol of symmetry and balance. During the process of constructing the wheel you will begin to recognize what areas of your life are not in balance, and where your attention is lacking and requires focus. Continuing working with the wheel after you constructed it. Sit with your wheel in silent meditation. Allow the wheel to assist you in gaining new and different perspectives.

medicine wheel spiritual ceremonyThe medicine wheel represents the many cycles of life. The circle is representative of life’s never ending cycle (birth, death, rebirth). Each stone or spoke placement in the wheel focuses on a different aspect of living.

A personal medicine wheel can be made using fetishes such as crystals, arrowheads, seashells, feathers, animal fur/bones, and so on. Take time to reflect on each aspect of your life (self, family, relationships, life purpose, community, finances, health, etc.) as you place objects within the circle.

Over the years I’ve been assisting people from all over the world to heal past wounds, physical, emotional and spiritual. I never know what to expect with each one and they are all different. No matter what you want to do from heal physical pain to an old emotional wound, drumming in the medicine wheel can help. This can help release negativity that you have been carrying around for a long time, sometimes we don’t even realize we are carrying it.

The term “medicine wheel” was first applied to the Big Horn Medicine Wheel in Wyoming, the most southern and one of the largest in existence. That site consists of a central circle of piled rock surrounded by a circle of stone; “Rays” of stones travel out from the central core of rock and its surrounding circle. The structure looks like the wheel of a bicycle.

The Medicine Wheel can take many different forms. It can be an artwork such as artifact or painting, or it can be a physical construction on the land. Hundreds or even thousands of Medicine Wheels have been built in North America over the last several centuries.

Movement in the Medicine Wheel is typically in a clockwise, or “sun-wise” direction. This helps to align with the forces of Nature, such as gravity and the rising and setting of the Sun.

Meanings of the Four Directions

There are many different interpretations of the Medicine Wheel. Each of the Four Directions (East, South, West, and North) is typically represented by a distinctive color, such as black, red, yellow, and white, which for some stands for the human races. The Directions can also represent:

  • Stages of life: birth, youth, adult, and elder.
  • Seasons of the year: spring, summer, fall and winter
  • Aspects of life: spiritual, emotional, intellectual, physical
  • Elements of nature: fire (or sun), air, water, and earth
  • Animals: Eagle, Bear, Coyote, Wolf, Buffalo and many others
  • Ceremonial plants: tobacco, sweet grass, sage, cedar

medicine wheel sycamore canyon sedonaThe East is held to represent the mind, air, the color yellow and ‘yellow skinned peoples’, learning the groups to which people belong and the infant.

The South holds the heart, fire, the color red and ‘red skinned peoples’, and the child.

The West holds the spirit, water, the color blue or black, and ‘black-skinned peoples’ and Adulthood.

The North represents the final life stage in the wheel, being an elder and passing on knowledge to the next generation so that the wheel may start again just like the circle it takes after. It is also associated with the color white, representing the white hair of the elders and the white skinned people.

In other practices, the Northern direction corresponds to Adulthood (the White Buffalo), the South represents Childhood (the Serpent), the West represents Adolescence (the Bear) and the Eastern direction represents Death and Re-birth (Eagle). In terms of social dynamics, community building and the use of Circles in Restorative Justice work, the four quadrants of the circle correspond to Introductions.

According to Native American astrology we were all born into a particular direction of the wheel and given an animal totem and animal clan.

The concept of the medicine wheel symbolically represents a nonlinear model of human development. Each compass direction on the wheel offers lessons and gifts that support the development of a balanced individual. The idea is to remain balanced at the center of the wheel while developing equally the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual aspects of one’s personality. The concept of the medicine wheel varies: different groups attribute different gifts to positions on the wheel. But the following offers a generalized overview of some lessons and gifts connected with the development process.

Lessons and gifts from the EAST, the place of first light, spring, and birth, include:
Warmth of the spirit
Purity, trust, and hope
Unconditional love
Courage
Truthfulness
Guidance and leadership
Capacity to remain in the present moment

Lessons and gifts from the SOUTH, the place of summer and youth, include:
Generosity, sensitivity, and loyalty
Romantic love
Testing of the physical body/self-control
Gifts of music and art
Capacity to express feelings openly in ways respectful to others

Lessons and gifts from the WEST, the place of autumn and adulthood, include:
Dreams, prayers, and meditation
Perseverance when challenged
Balance between passionate loyalty and spiritual insight
Use of personal objects, sacred of life’s meaning
Fasting, ceremony, self-knowledge, and vision

Lessons and gifts from the NORTH, the place of winter and elders, include:
Intellectual wisdom
Ability to complete tasks that began as a vision
Detachment from hate, jealousy, desire, anger, and fear
Ability to see the past, present, and future as interrelated

These are all different teaching from all corners of the earth, and as you can see they each slightly differ from one another. Therefore in creating and performing a Medicine Wheel Ceremony, there is no wrong way to do it. So dance, sing, shake the rattles and beat the drum as it all will help you on your personal medicine path.

So if you are coming to Sedona and want to experience this ceremony, I would highly recommend it whether it’s with us or anyone else, it is healing and will be an experience you will remember forever.

Would you like a  Medicine Wheel built on your property? I would love to build a Medicine Wheel for you! Do you have a perfect location picked out on your property? Contact me to set up a time to build a wheel and hold an activating ceremony.

Beasley Flats Cave Dwellings Camp Verde Arizona

native american cave dwellings at beasly flatsBeasly Flats is a historical location in Camp Verde along the Verde River. Many years ago an indigenous tribe, most likely the Hopi, lived here. There are many cave dwellings and several pithouses nearby. I actualy grew up only a few miles from here where there is another similar set of caves and pithouse ruins. This area is loaded with Native American history. A beautiful place to meditate and have a picknick.

petroglyph rock at beasly flats (1)You can see this petroglyph rock on your way to Beasley Fats. Ive heard that this rock goes about 30 feet into the earth. DOT tried to remove it once and failed so they just left it near the road and put a guardrail around it. On one side it shows San Francisco Peaks looking in the direction of the peaks! The spirals are said to be a map of where they were and where they were going. History shows that the Hopi were migrating from the far south to eventually the Hopi Mesas where the now live today.

salt mineAlso along the way you will see an old salt mine. In the past this was a highly valued trade commodity.

Hopi Ceremonial Kiva

Kiva InteriorThis magical photograph was taken down inside the Kiva here at Mesa Verde National Park. It is a panorama of 8 images. TI wanted to convey a sense of Spiritual awareness with the Ancestral Puebloans ( Anasazi ). The shadows and light coming down from the world above invokes a sense of timelessness. One almost expects to see the Elders gathered here. This photograph was taken in late August of 2012, ( Spruce Tree House ).

kiva is a room used by modern Puebloans for religious rituals, many of them associated with the kachina belief system. Among the modern Hopi and most other Pueblo peoples, kivas are square-walled and underground, and are used for spiritual ceremonies.

Similar subterranean rooms are found among ruins in the American southwest, indicating ritual or cultural use by the ancient peoples of the region including the Ancient Pueblo Peoples, the Mogollon and the Hohokam. Those used by the ancient Pueblos of the Pueblo I Era and following, designated by the Pecos Classification system developed by archaeologists, were usually round, and generally believed to have been used for religious and other communal purposes.

When designating an ancient room as a kiva, archaeologists make assumptions about the room’s original functions and how those functions may be similar to or differ from kivas used in modern practice. The kachina belief system appears to have emerged in the Southwest at approximately AD 1250, while kiva-like structures occurred much earlier. This suggests that the room’s older functions may have been changed or adapted to suit the new religious practice.

As cultural changes occurred, particularly during the Pueblo III period between 1150 and 1300, kivas continued to have a prominent place in the community. However, some kivas were built above ground. Kiva architecture became more elaborate, with tower kivas and great kivas incorporating specialized floor features. For example, kivas found in Mesa Verde were generally keyhole-shaped. In most larger communities, it was normal to find one kiva for each five or six rooms used as residences. Kiva destruction, primarily by burning, has been seen as a strong archaeological indicator of conflict and warfare among people of the Southwest during this period.

Fifteen top rooms encircle the central chamber of the vast Great Kiva at Aztec Ruins National Monument. The room’s “…purpose is unclear…. Each had an exterior doorway to the plaza…. Four massive pillars of alternating masonry and horizontal poles held up the ceiling beams, which in turn supported an estimated ninety-five-ton roof. Each pillar rested on four shaped stone disks, weighing about 355 pounds apiece. These discs are of limestone, which came from mountains at least forty miles away.” (A Trail Guide to Aztec Ruins, 4th printing:WNPA, 2004).

After 1325 or 1350, except in the Hopi and Pueblo region, the ratio changed from 60 to 90 rooms for each kiva. This may indicate a religious or organizational change within the society, perhaps affecting the status and number of clans among the Pueblo people. The use of the kiva was for men and boys only.

Resource: Wikipedia.org

You Deserve a Spiritually Healing Sedona Retreat

Amitabha Stupa Sedona ArizonaYou Deserve a Spiritually Healing Sedona Retreat. If you are like most people, you work very hard every day. You probably work more than you play! We its time you deserve a relaxing, healing, and fun Retreat in Sedona. Sedona Shamanic Journeys now offers Sedona Shamanic Retreats. We have been offering Native American Shamanic Healing, Ceremony and Vortex Tours since 2009.

We offer three day Shamanic Retreats…

The day you arrive in your accommodations surrounded by the red rocks you will experience a Healing Massage right in your room! Relax in the hot tub and settle in to your new sacred space.

This image was processed by Neat Image. NeatImage.comWhat is the difference between a regular retreat and a Shamanic Retreat? All retreats are great but if you are wanting to learn and integrate Native teachings, ceremony and prayer, learn about your Animal Spirit Guides, and heal on a spiritual level then this is the retreat for you.

Our retreats and focused around the ancient practice of Shamanic Drumming at the Medicine Wheel, Connecting with you Animal Totems during a peaceful meditation at Oak Creek, and a Vision Quest to find guidance and inspiration on your life’s path.

Learn to BALANCE your life for health, gratitude, abundance, and fun.

The second day we go out on the sacred land and perform a traditional Lakota style Medicine Wheel Ceremony. We set our intentions of what we want to let go of and also what we are grateful for in our lives, then we drum and sing healing Lakota songs and dance around the wheel.

Oak Creek at Indian GardensNext we enjoy a healthy and energizing lunch at one of Sedona’s well know restaurants. Do you ever feel tired or sluggish after eating? Well after this meal you will feel alive because it will be loaded with nutrition and a high vibration of energy and love!

Then we do a Sacred Path card reading to seek guidance from your ancestors and spirit guides. These are Native teachings that you can easily apply to your everyday life.

Then return to your relaxing accommodations to reflect on your day.

The third day we set back out on the healing land to sit by Oak Creek to do a Shamanic Journey to connect with your Animal Spirit Guides and receive messages to assist you on your journey.

white hawkWe then enjoy another healthy lunch over a Sacred Counsel session. Similar to Life Coaching, we will look at what may be blocking you from moving forward or throwing you life out of balance and set new goals and a powerful action plan for moving forward. Rebekah is a certified Life Coach and graduated from the Southwestern Institute of Healing Arts in 2007.

Again, relax in your accommodations and journal about your experiences and the messages and guidance you received. Preparing to take it all back with you, seeing the world now with new eyes and a new appreciation for all things.

View Retreat description and prices

Call 928.420.2077 or email Rebekah today to book your Sedona Shamanic Retreat.

Four Directions Prayer

four directions prayerStanding in the East

Thank you Thunkaslia (Creator), Wankan Tanka (Great Spirit), Grandmothers, Grandfathers, Ancestors, All of our Spirit Guides and our Animal Spirit Guides for bringing us Wanbli Galeshka (the Eagle) in the East. We ask that you lend us your strong eyes to be able to see our lives from above.

And where Grandfather Sun rises every day to warm our bodies, gives us light to see, and grow our crops. We thank you for the abundance that you bring us.

And the spring time that brings us new beginnings to express our unique talents and creativity.

Standing in the South

Thank you Thunkaslia (Creator), Wankan Tanka (Great Spirit), Grandmothers, Grandfathers, Ancestors, All of our Spirit Guides and our Animal Spirit Guides for bringing us Heyoka (the Coyote) in the South.

Help us learn to balance work and play, to awaken the child within and return to innocence. Show us how to laugh more and have more fun, and to not take life too seriously and to recognize this.

Standing in the West

Thank you Thunkaslia (Creator), Wankan Tanka (Great Spirit), Grandmothers, Grandfathers, Ancestors, All of our Spirit Guides and our Animal Spirit Guides for bringing us Matho (the Bear) in the West.

We ask Bear for strength and courage in our adult lives to face our fears and difficult situations with ease. Help us to turn this fear into excitement so that we may live our lives to the fullest.

We also ask for the ability to know when to go within to seek answers and for spiritual guidance. And to trust that we can always find answers in ourselves and in nature.

Standing in the North

Thank you Thunkaslia (Creator), Wankan Tanka (Great Spirit), Grandmothers, Grandfathers, Ancestors, All of our Spirit Guides and our Animal Spirit Guides for bringing us Tatanka (the Buffalo) in the North.

We ask to remember the day when the buffalo roamed freely upon this land. And when the early people  saw that and knew that all of their need would be met, and they would have everything that they need right when they needed it. They saw abundance in everything and did not know of lack. Help us return to that time.

Teach us to honor and respect our elders, the ones who came before us and have lived many years. Show us the old ways so that we may carry on the traditions of our ancestors.

Standing in the Center

Thank you Maka (Mother Earth) for being here for us two leggeds, and for all of our relations. Help us to respect you more and spend more time with you knowing that we can always find true security in you. Help us to walk lightly among your sacred body and appreciate all living things and all of creation that we share it with. Aho Mitakuye Oyasin (All my relations)

Hetchetu Welo! And so it is done!

12-12-12 Medicine Wheel Ceremony Sedona

11.11.11 medicine wheel sedonaJoin us on 12-12-12 for an all people Medicine Wheel ceremony in Sedona Arizona.

During the ceremony we will clear our energies with a smudge (sage) ceremony, release the past and the old paradigm beliefs that block us from experiencing true abundance and healing. Then we will share our gratitude and create a vision of the future we want to experience. We will use the traditional Lakota ways of the Medicine Wheel as a tool to support us on our new path.

December 2012 is not the end of the world, but it could be the end of an old world. Join us in ceremony to honor the past and invite the future.

This is a free event offered to the public and there will be a free raffle with items handmade by Rebekah and Bear. Of course donations are always welcome.

When: Ceremony begins at 12:pm noon and could be 2-3 hours

Where: Meet in parking lot across from the look-out at the top of Airport Mesa. Airport Rd. West Sedona

Bring your drums, rattles, and prayer items to use as ceremonial tools in the wheel.

Native American Ruins at Lynx Lake Prescott

It started with a series of events. I had been asking for a sign, an answer, or some vision of what I was supposed to do because recently  I felt I was lacking in purpose. It seemed like my life had been put on hold. Today I was going to go hike around the nearby lake and find a place to meditate and pray on this. It was early morning and the water was still. The air was calm and the sun was shining through the damp branches of the pine trees. It had rained the day before.

I parked on the north side and was going to hike all the way around, and I didn’t care how long it would take me. It was a small lake so I knew it would only be about an hour or so. As I started the trail I already began to ask questions as I was walking. What am I supposed to do, how can I achieve a feeling of having more purpose right now in my life? Great Spirit, please give me a sign, please answer my prayers!

I repeated this prayer as if were a mantra. I was now half way around the lake and I realized that I was no longer praying, but now just enjoying my beautiful surroundings.

There was a shortcut that cut across what appeared to be a dried up portion of the lake. Since I was not in a hurry I decided to take the long way around. Somehow, I managed to get off the main trail and onto a smaller, unused trail. It was leading me in the right direction, but defiantly was not the main trail. There were tree branches hanging down far enough that I had to duck to get through. I heard a noise to my right, I looked and it was a small garter snake! We both froze and starred at each other for a moment. I wasn’t afraid because I knew it wasn’t poisonous and as a child growing up in Camp Verde Arizona, I was used to seeing snakes, if fact, when I was about eight or nine, I kept a four foot long Bull Snake as a pet. After years of studying Animal Messages, I knew this was a message of action. To have a Garter Snake cross your path means to act. To act on as many ideas as possible but do not become over stressed. This is not the time to sit on ideas. Inspiration flows. But what was I supposed to act on? I needed a clearer sign.

I knew the answers were starting to come now so I continued on the path. Just a short distance ahead I looked to the left and saw what appeared to be a corner of a stone room that had fallen. Could it really be? I took a few more steps pushing the branched out of my face, and I saw another partial wall. I detoured off the trail, as I usually do, and climbed over the berm of rocks. I was now standing at the edge of the mountain in an ancient Indian village. There must have been thirty to forty rooms! All collapsed of course, but what an amazing discovery. There were corners and parts of walls all around me. It’s like I had stepped back in time. I thought, Does anyone know about this?

I stayed for a while and took a few pictures on my smartphone. I even found a few petroglyphs on a rock nearby. I was in my element. I always love hiking to ancient ruins on my days off, but discovering one was a blessing. Was this a part of my prayer? Is this a sign? Is this what I am supposed to do. Still a bit confused I decided to process the event that just took place as I walked around the other side of the lake.

Half way around I saw several baby ducks and a momma duck near the shore. I stopped to take a closer look and rest. Then of to the distance I heard what seemed to be Native American chanting and drumming coming from the direction of the ruins. As I took my attention away from the ducks toward the chanting, it stopped. Did I really just hear that?

At one point during the intense part of my Shamanic studies, I was taught how to listen to the land. It could reveal it secrets just by listening close enough. I was first taught to lay near the area and put a small stone on my forehead, it would tell me everything about what had happened there. I used this ancient technique many times until I just became a natural at it. I got to the point where I could just stand in an area and connect with it. So yes, I do believe I heard the chanting coming from the direction of the ruins.

The hike around the lake seemed to happen so fast and before I knew it I was driving back home. But the signs continued. I was about a mile from my house when I saw a huge hawk gliding above just in front of me. I was only doing about twenty five miles per hour. This hawk seemed to be guiding me home. It even turned onto my street and once I parked in my driveway it circled for a moment then flew off. Another sign?

The Natives believed that the animals were the messengers from the Great Spirit to help guide us on our human paths. One ancient tradition is that we each have our own Animal Spirit Guides, and that they come to us when we need answers or guidance. Hawk has been one of my guides since I can remember. Just as the eagle is the messenger to the Great Spirit, the hawk is the messenger to the people. What was it trying to say? Be open to receiving a message?

Encryption Canyon Petroglyphs in Williamson Valley Arizona

These petroglyphs are at the Cooper Morgan trail at Talking Rock Ranch just 20 miles north of Prescott.

Talking Rock got its name from a historical site on the property.

Over thirteen hundred Native American Petroglyphs can be found describing stories on the walls of what is now called “Encryption Canyon.

These ancient writings were discovered by The Yavapai Chapter of the Arizona Archaeological Society in 2002 and believe they were originally created by the Hualapai Indians.

Once this discovery was found, the owner of the property at Talking Rock Ranch donated the ancient petroglyph site, some 15 acres, to the indigenous Yavapai Indian Tribe for preservation and protection from development.

Permission is needed from the Yavapai tribe to see the impressive petroglyphs and visitation is limited to ensure the ancient findings remain preserved.

Prescott Lakes Petroglyphs Solstice Calendar

These are the petroglyphs at Prescott Lakes in Prescott Arizona. They depict celestial bodies and ancient calendars.

Tucked away on a mesa off Solstice Drive, the Petroglyph Trail offers 360-degree views of the Prescott area, with Thumb Butte, Granite Mountain, and the San Francisco Peaks all visible on a clear day.

In addition, the park includes a display of 30 to 40 prehistoric petroglyph rock drawings.

George Sheats, a member of the Prescott Lakes trails and landscaping committees, noted that developers found thousands of examples of the prehistoric rock art throughout the 1,100-acre Prescott Lakes area.

With help from the Yavapai-Prescott Tribe, developers consolidated many of the petroglyphs on a series of parks, including the one on the mesa off Solstice Drive.

The park also includes a sign that explains the significance of the solstice to the mesa.